November 11–December 18
2022

Virginia Fleck fills the gallery with shimmers of sound and light, strings of tens of thousands of aluminum can tabs. From salvage and discard, Fleck weaves a tour de force of serenity, wonder, and peace.

Visit Thursday–Sunday, 2-6 pm until December 18.

SHIMMER opened 11-11 on 11:11 am.

Press Release [pdf]

September 23–October 23
2022

Brad Tucker, Transmountain

New art by Brad Tucker: cheerfully complex, savvy, optimistic, funny, reflective, and beautiful. It no longer matters what they are; they resemble painting-sculptures.

Transmountain design is italo-modern by way of El Paso. They embed critical reflections into luxurious forms, using material as grammar.

Press Release [pdf]

Brad Tucker in the studio
Brad Tucker in the studio
Transmountain - Concrete Breeze Blocks
Transmountain, Concrete Breeze Blocks
Brad Tucker Goofy Foot
Brad Tucker, “Goofy Foot”
August 11–September 10
2022

images of hot doom float in translucent layers of soaked color

visit Thursday–Sunday, 2–6pm

Drew Liverman’s new paintings are immediate and oddly refined. Thin layers of summer-intense color soak into the canvas, or float above it. The compositions breathe with yin, and sear with eye-burn emotion and thought.

The subject matter: hot doom, the joys of love, bike rides, Olaf from Frozen, Goya’s covens, and scraps of what could be something for a place to live, for a time.

Introspective, with a funny gloom, these are paintings for an infinite summer.

The exhibition begins August 11 with visiting hours 2-6pm, Thursday to Sunday. Throughout the run of the show there may be receptions, talks, and other events. We’ll let you know by email and instagram.

June 25–July 24
2022

Stella Alesi

&

Momo
Michael W. Hall
Michelle Marchesseault
Evan Horn


show begins June 25 with visiting hours 2-6pm
receptions and events throughout the run of the show


spirit forms, continuous and ever-changing
& describes Alesi’s art and practice: flowing always to new forms and new reasons. Alesi works in a series:, each an era in a moment, marking the emotional time of the making. They seldom revisit a series. Alesi moves to the next one, and the next, and the next. And, and, and.

a solo show as a community
& is a Stella Alesi solo show as a community. Alesi invited four artists to contribute­—friends and those they admire from afar. All searching abstractionists, seeking to make a spirit material. Each artist balances rigor with freedom, finding the eternal in the moment of making: Momo, Michelle Marchesseault, Michael W. Hall, and Evan Horn.

Stella Alesi
Stella Alesi
April 12th, 2022 from the Comfort series
oil and repair tape on oil paper
22.5×22.5 inches
May 13–June 12
2022

Matt Steinke

Matt Steinke‘s second solo show at Northern-Southern: modular kinetic and musical sculpture and new music.

Un•verb examines the implausibility of stillness through sculptures issuing sound. The exhibition features a gallery of robotic musical objects chanting and chatting with each other in an aspirational din. They attempt to attain health, wholeness, and calm, referencing still life painting, noise pollution, self-help literature, consumer culture, and guided meditation.

Matt Steinke’s work is—in turns and all-at-once—music, robotics, sculpture, animation, instrument building, puppetry, and computer programing. Steinke gives objects voice and identity. Mechanical sound sculptures mimic the behaviors and personalities of animals, people, plants, and machines. The objects discourse, chant, and interact in group ruminations on consumerism, morality, transcendence, ecology, health, and neurodiversity.

Visit
Thursday–Sunday
2-6pm

May 19–June 18
2022

Visit by Appointment until June 18, 2022. To schedule, email: hello@northern-southern.com

Tyeschea West was one of the principle photographers of Where is Here, photographic portraits of the people of East Austin, ages 0-100.

For Drawing Conclusions, she expands her palette. She layers and deconstructs her photography with collage and painting, either obscuring the image or clarifying the ambiguities and motions of her subjects. West remains a portraitist. Sensitive, kind and genuinely curious, the work shows her care for the people who sit for her lens.

Read more:
Drawing Conclusions reviewed by Barbara Purcell for Glasstire

Tyeschea West and Matt Steinke are interviewed by Mike Lee on Austin Public Radio

Tyeschea West-Naima
“I have to remember, I’m more than enough, even if most of society has been brainwashed into believing differently”
March 25–April 30
2022

Visit Thursday–Sunday, 2–6pm

Rachael Starbuck, Michael Muelhaupt, Jesse Cline: fitting runs until April 30, with special events throughout the month of April.



Rachael Starbuck, Michael Muelhaupt, and Jesse Cline live in a house in one of north Austin’s less noticed neighborhoods. Professionally Starbuck and Muelhaupt are sculptors, materials experts, and educators. Cline practices and teaches design. They are all three artists.

Their new work for fitting engages with life. They serve growth, offer comfort, and invite play.

Starbuck‘s work imagines touch and its absence. Ceramic pots bulge like bags with soil. Brass rods lithely support the stems of living plants. The plants, nurtured by Starbuck, are descended from cuttings from her childhood home in Florida. Hand-sized and pit-fired ceramic “handholds” recreate the feel of holding Starbuck’s hands in yours.

Muelhaupt sculptures are functional furniture. With some, he Frankensteins surplus furniture parts into witty pastiches, like a ’00s Droog designer. Other pieces lovingly tease modernism, upholstering pirated classics with white socks or Starbuck’s father’s old leather belts. Gentle startles, the sculptures are comfortable in unexpected ways.

Cline‘s sculptures are puzzles as formal meditations. Tactile, oblique, and hypnotic, the pieces are answers without questions.

This work is Texas now, earth-toned punk. Radically new and subversive by being kind, gentle, crafted, warm, life-scale. Anti-Judd, Anti-Sera. Their hands make homes.

—Phillip Niemeyer

Sunday, March 13, 2022
11am – 5pm

Drew Liverman
J. Johari Palacio
live painting
----
Katherine Vaughn
dance

Drew Liverman and J. Johari Palacio will paint live for an audience, between 11am and 5pm at Northern-Southern.

Katherine Vaughn will show up to dance, unexpectedly between 2pm and 3pm.

This is Northern–Southern’s SXSW 2022 Day Party, and it’s organized by Keyheira Keys and Phillip Niemeyer.

Food provided by Baby Greens. Drinks sponsored by Jack Daniels. Big thanks to them!

2-22 to 2-29
2022

two over two

Phillip Niemeyer
& Friends

2/2 (“Two Over Two”) opens at the beginning of Pisces Season: 2-22-22 and closes on the day that would be 2-29 ( aka March 1).

Visiting hours 2-6 pm every day until it closes. Every day at 2:22 pm the show will be re-arranged. If it is cold, the coffee and tea will be hot. If its hot, the seltzers will be cold. Every day there will be events.

Friday, 2-25
2:22 pm — art is rearranged
hosted by Mark Fagan

Saturday, 2-26
2:22 pm — art is rearranged with dancer Katherine Vaughn
hosted by Beth Nottingham

Sunday, 2-27
2:22 pm — art is rearranged with dancer Katherine Vaughn
hosted by Phillip Niemeyer

Monday, 2-28
2:22 pm — art is rearranged and photographed by artist Amanda Julia Steinback. Those present could be subjects of the photos, as well.
hosted by Amanda Julia Steinback

Tuesday, 3-1
2:22 pm — art is rearranged for the last time.
4:44 pm — closing happy hour
hosted by Amanda Julia Steinback

Wednesday, 3-2
Artist Run Club Runception
6:30 am — art, one last time, with talk through by Phillip Niemeyer
7:00 am — Town (Ladybird) Lake Run
coffee and bananas

Katherine Vaughn & Phillip Niemeyer hanging 2/2 at 2:22, 2-24. Video grab by Stella Alesi
%, 2019, acrylic on wood panel, 24×24 inches, hang any way
Emma Hadzi Antich, Eye, 2021, acrylic and metal-leaf or gold leaf on a rock from Mont Sainte-Odile
JAN 15–FEB 19
2022

A Commitment to What is Before You is a joyful quiet, a call to look, feel, move, breath and be.

Paintings by Alexandre Pépin play silent games. The oils are both light and earthy, like the touch of tall grass on naked skin.

Baskets by Donya Stockton hold tautologies, each a woven impossibility, a wicker sculpture.

Ceramics by Ryan McKerley are marked with lines and shapes that mimic the effects of erosion possible only with a technique called water carving.

Zine with works and interviews with the artists [pdf]

Email to innquire about available work.

Jan 7-8
2022

FESTO FEST is a festival of manifestos.

Public and personal festos from artists and others will be displayed on the walls of Northern-Southern gallery, January 7–8, 2022.

Download all the Festos (pdf)


Visiting hours
January 7–8
Friday and Saturday
2-6pm


Organizers
Festo Fest is organized by Suzanne Wys, Ann Armstrong, and Phillip Niemeyer.

Nov 5 – Dec 18
2021

Laura Lit

FAR IN

Animal-sized painted wall reliefs of wood, resin, and clay suggest sentience. Each is a deliberate dreaming, a spirit made solid, a tether to within.

Laura Lit: Far In ‘zine [pdf] – with images of the work and an interview with Lit.

Inquire about available works.

For Far In, Laura Lit summoned the full range of her experience: as painter, and from her work in film makeup, special effects, and architectural restoration. She composes the forms by meditation, or before sleep. Only when it is honed does she commit the design to paper, usually in a single drawing. Lit works alone, without assistance or fabrication. She jigsaws wood skeletons, sculpts molds, fine brushes oils, pours dyed resins, until something on the wall lives.

FAR IN is on the forefront of what abstraction could become again, post Hilma af Klint: spiritual, deeply imagined, ur-real.

Laura Lit: Atomic
Laura Lit
Atomic, 2021
wood, foam, paperclay, resin, acrylic, oil
34″ x 42″ x 3″
Oct 1–24, 2021

Alec Dartley
Amanda Julia Steinback
Brianna McIntyre
Clark Most
Drew Liverman
Hannah Cole
Harrison Marshall
Michael Villarreal
Alan Watts

The paintings and works in LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION depict specific places, pins on a map: domestic nooks, urban corners, secret trees, vast lakes, remote plains, the scars of highways. What do we make of these places?

What, and when, is a place?

Alec Dartley (b. 1973, Englewood, New Jersey) paints his old home in Englewood, New Jersey. Dartley paints plein air. The work is began and completed at the site.

Amanda Julia Steinback (b. 1984 Posey County, Indiana) pairs photographs of locations in a synchronous entanglement. Steinback currently lives in Austin, Texas, a base for her routine solo cross-country photography trips.

Brianna McIntyre (b. 1992 St. Louis, Missouri) critiques I-35 between 12th Street and MLK. McIntyre is a sculptor and a object designer with a critical practice, living in Austin, Texas.

Clark Most (b. 1957 Petoskey, Michigan) hangs a large scale translucent photographic print of his favorite spot: the coast of Lake Michigan facing south toward Ludington. Most is a professor of design at Central Michigan University.

Drew Liverman (b. 1979 Groton, Connecticut) paints scenes of his home in East Austin, the yard of Momofunus studios, and a trail in Delaware. Liverman recently had an solo iterative drawing show with N–S, 2020’s PREMEMBER.

Hannah Cole (b. 1978 St. Louis, Missouri) watercolors touch-scale details of a street near her old studio in Gowanus, Brooklyn, and of a tree near an old family home in rural Maine. Cole currently lives and works in Asheville, North Carolina, where she shows with our friends, Tracy Morgan Gallery.

Harrison Marshall (b. 1974 New York, New York ) paints oil Morris Williams golf course in East Austin. An architect and painter, Marshall lives in Austin, Texas.

Michael Villarreal (b. 1987, Austin, Texas) paints with oils his family’s land in Lytton Springs, Texas. Villarreal is a professor at Texas State University, and a member of the ICOSA collective.

Alan Watts (b. 1974 Houston, Texas) built a clock to count down the time Northern-Southern has left at its downtown space. Watts is half of the duo CLAW. He currently works as an artist for Meow Wolf.

LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION is organized by Phillip Niemeyer & Adreon Henry

THANK YOU: Stella Alesi, Rachel Freeman, James Turner, and Beth Nottingham

July 20, 2020 – July 24, 2021

BATON

an additive show by relay

Brad Tucker
Adreon Henry
Dan Hurlbut
Ric Nelson
Emma Hadzi Antich
André Fuqua
Naomi Schlinke
Leon Alesi
Matt Steinke
Sev Coursen
Dawn Okoro
Vy Ngo
Transmountain
Tyeschea West
Jimmy Luu
James Turner
Stella Alesi
Emily Lee
Phillip Niemeyer
Rachel Freeman
& ...

images
statement

Beginning July 2020, Northern–Southern gallery hosts an ever-evolving installation by a series of artists working in turn. BATON is a continuous installation by relay. Work has been added month-by-month. Some objects were moved around, but little left. New work is still being added.

BATON began last summer in the midst of an indefinite lock down. The artists mingled in the space, distanced by time. The show began sparse, like country land about to become a town. Large works spread out without concern for space. Now, a year in, the gallery is dense with overlapping intentions. Work adjusts, converses, and layers: a community.



ORGANIZER’S STATEMENT

The COVID pandemic presents an opportunity to expand our conceptions of art spaces and art shows.

We cannot responsibly host crowds, but Northern-Southern gallery is safe for a single artist, or two, masked and distanced. BATON is a group workshop for a single participant at a time.

The participants’ intentions and actions may pile on top of each other as months pass, lacquers of successive nows. The overall show—for most experienced only as documentation—could encompass the walls in every way they are and as they were. Northern-Southern is an art time-space.

The participants in BATON will be encouraged to experiment, to push the parameters of their practice. They may use the space to install work that want to see in a gallery context, or ignore “art” and just do things. They may hang the work of another artist. They can rearrange what was there previous, or make work that reacts to it or re-contextualizes it. Or all the above.

BATON will never be, it will continuously become, until we drop the baton at the end of our run.

—Phillip Niemeyer, July 2020

April 10, 2021

decay, renew, repeat
wild art in Austin, Texas and beyond

Laura Latimer
Giampiero Selvaggio
Christos Pathiakis
Amy Scofield
André Fuqua
Hannah Spector
Jesse Cline
Michael Muelhaupt
Rachael Starbuck
Cheyenne Weaver
Adreon Denson Henry
Vy Ngo
+
Emily Lee
Jonas Criscoe
Phillip Niemeyer
+
Alyssa Taylor Wendt

subscribe
statement

TOOO is a group show of wild art, installed outdoors in public spaces across Austin, Texas, and beyond, for the month of April 2021.

TOOO builds upon two preceding exhibitions, TO and TOO. TO was an outdoor show of paths and directions considered on the eve of a new lunar year. A month later, as the work from TO half-faded, TOO added new work, new paths. Now all but one work from TO remains. TOOO presents a set of renewed options a generation removed from their origins.

The work is wild art, sculptures and interventions mixing it up in semi-overlooked spaces dispersed across Austin. The art encompasses the experience of searching for the work.

To view TOOO, subscribe for free below. You will be emailed a link to a map and information about the artists and the work on the opening day.


Subscribe to TOOO

* indicates required





Organizer’s Statement

TOOO marks a year of Northern-Southern’s pandemic programming, mostly outdoor shows of socially distant wild art.

Each exhibition was dispersed in time and space in a new way. LEFT IN LEAVES trickled out at random, day by day. The artists improvised locations and works throughout May 2020. NO OUTLET opened all at once, an August bloom. Street signs were re-purposed as didactics. Each piece was installed at a marked dead end, options at the end of options. Sterling Allen’s PHOTOREALISM was a solo show on an over-lookable un-leased office ground. Allen’s work permeated the leave-behind and refuse, tipping the distinction between art and non-art toward universal transcendence. TO presented directions and paths as work. Work was not deinstalled; it decayed. TOO renewed TO; new works added to the surviving pieces.

TOOO renews TO a second time. Only one work remains from TO: Alyssa Taylor Wendt’s audio meditation on art scenes of the past. A few things hold on from TOO, but they too will fade before the term of the show. The artists in TOOO are a mix of old and new, all making new work. A new generation creates new paths.

We live in motion. Nothing remains still for even a second. We continue continuing, and continually change. Every breathe is a renewal.

The white walls are only in our minds.

—Phillip Niemeyer

March 6–31
2021

paths and directions considered, continued
outdoors Austin, Texas, and beyond

Alyssa Taylor Wendt
Adreon Denson Henry
Emma Hadzi Antich
Laura Latimer
Sean Ripple
Staci Maloney & Michelle Smolensky
Tammy West
Ted Carey
Zoe Berg
+
Emily Lee
Jonas Criscoe
Phillip Niemeyer
Rachel Freeman
-
Amanda Julia Steinback
Amy Scofield & Lisa Hallee
Chris Lyons

subscribe
statement

TOO is the renewal of TO, an outdoor show paths and directions considered as art experience installed outdoors, in semi-wild public spaces across Austin, Texas, and beyond. Some works from TO remain, some have changed, and others have faded. New paths emerge; TOO adds four additional pieces.

TOO will be an active concern until April when it will renew as TOOO with additional works.

The work in TO and TOO can most broadly speaking be called wild art. The media encompasses audio tours, trails, portals, sculpture, digital media, instructions, new land-marks, way-finding marks, sibyls, remote running sessions, and care stations. The work asks you to walk with it, around it, between it, by it, to it.

Subscribe, for free to receive a link to a map and information about the artists and works:


Subscribe to TOO

* indicates required





Organizer’s Statement

TOO is the renewal of TO. Some paths faded, and others appear.

At its conclusion TOO will renew as TOOO. The show itself is a path to a future made by present choices.

—Phillip Niemeyer

February 6–27
2021

paths and directions, considered
outdoors Austin, Texas, and beyond

Adreon Denson Henry
Alyssa Taylor Wendt
Amanda Julia Steinback
Amy Scofield & Lisa Hallee
Chris Lyons
Emma Hadzi Antich
Laura Latimer
Sean Ripple
Staci Maloney & Michelle Smolensky
Tammy West
Ted Carey
Zoe Berg

subscribe
statement

TO is a group show of paths and directions considered as art experience installed outdoors, in semi-wild public spaces across Austin, Texas, and beyond.

TO will be an active concern until March 7, 2021, when it will renew as TOO with additional works.

The work in TO can most broadly speaking be called wild art. The media encompasses audio tours, trails, portals, sculpture, digital media, instructions, new land-marks, way-finding marks, sibyls, remote running sessions, and care stations. The work asks you to walk with it, around it, between it, by it, to it.

Subscribe, for free to receive a map and information about the artists and the work on the opening day:


Subscribe to TO

* indicates required





Organizer’s Statement

We approach the tip of a new era, the last waning moon before a new lunar year. The year of the Rat passes. The year of the Ox dawns.

The end of the pandemic feels, hopefully, closer. Sooner than a flinch a new time will engulf us. We will resume, but not from where we left off. If we claim the strength to build anew—where to marshal our efforts? Where to?

TO is the pause before the lurch. TO is the pointed toe leading a pitch.

Work in this show may answer questions, and may propose others. They may also just be enjoyed, and not just in still contemplation. Many of these works ask you to walk with them, or even run.

TO is third in Northern-Southern’s trilogy of group exhibitions of wild art, responses to the Covid Pandemic.

—Phillip Niemeyer

December 2-19
2020

sign-up
statements and images

Photorealism is an outdoor exhibit of work by Sterling Allen.

The entire show takes place on the exterior grounds of an overlook-able, un-leased building on West Anderson Lane. Constructed both in his studio and on site, each artwork exists in conjunction with the surrounding environment, slipping between obvious and invisible.

Subscribers will be emailed links to a map to the site and information about the works starting December 2, 2020. The show concludes December 19.


Sign-up for a map to the site:

* indicates required





Stabbed Growth Seat
2019
Found objects, plywood, nails, epoxy
27½ x 16¼ x 15 inches

Organizer’s Statement

Sterling Allen has been making installations outside for a few years now. Because he does this without formal permission, the pieces must be installed, photographed, and promptly removed. Thus, the installations exist in pictures, and that creates a problem not uncommon in contemporary life. Think of this project as a stretch in two opposite directions: on one hand, Sterling insists on the complex artistic importance of place; on the other hand, he prompts himself to communicate that complexity only in pictures. Photorealism is the first formal outdoor exhibition within this ongoing practice.

—Emily Lee

October 11, 2020 – the future
a new drawing every week until the set is complete

images

Drew Liverman (b. Groton, CT 1979) is an artist in Austin, Texas. His drawing and oil painting balances the moment and its reflection, memory and form, the fast and the careful.

PREMEMBER will be a series of drawings of the places of Austin still here—but for how long?

N-S will release the drawings as Liverman completes them, roughly one a week delivered on Sundays. The show will conclude when he finishes the last drawing in the set.


August 22 – September 22
2020

options at the end of options

Adreon Denson Henry
Amanda Julia Steinback
Amy Scofield
Emma Hadzi Antich
Laura Latimer
Leon Alesi
Mai Gutierrez
Ric Nelson
Sarah Fagan
Saul Jerome San Juan
Sean Ripple
Staci Maloney
Tammy West

images

No Outlet is a gallery of interventions and intentions at dead ends, sidewalk ends, cul-de-sacs, end of paths, and no outlets, dispersed across Austin.



Organizer’s Statement

We can read the signage and roads of our City as texts: fictions, histories, habits, doodles, scripts, tarots…

The “No Outlet” sign marks an end of explicit options. The art made for these stages present new options.

—Phillip Niemeyer